Writing Editor Blogs

The Writer’s Dig
by Brian A. Klems

Online Editor Brian A. Klems covers everything about writing on his blog. From grammar to writing tips to publishing advice to best practices in finding an agent to fueling your creative fire, he’s got you covered by pulling in great tips (not just from himself but from from other published and award-winning authors, too). Check out his advice—your writing career will thank you. Read Brian’s Blog


Guide to Literary Agents Blog
by Chuck Sambuchino

GLA Editor Chuck Sambuchino keeps track of all news related to literary agents and writing conferences on his blog. Common features include agent interviews, new agency listings, agency profiles, upcoming conferences of interest, contests and other publishing opportunities, valuable writing resources, submission tips and information, and a blogroll of other agent blogs. Read Chuck’s Blog


There Are No Rules
by the editors of Writer’s Digest

Get on the cutting edge of today’s publishing trends and how authors can succeed in a world of fast-paced technological change, guided by the editors of Writer’s Digest. You’ll get an inside look at the work, play, and passion of the publishing business and find practical tools for success. Read There Are No Rules


Poetic Asides
by Robert Brewer

Published poet Robert Lee Brewer blogs on issues affecting poets from the poet’s perspective. As the editor of Writer’s Market, Brewer also shares insights on the publishing industry, especially as it relates to poetry and the poetry markets. He also explains poetic forms, interviews other published poets, and provides the occasional poetry prompt. Read Robert’s Blog


Weekly Round-up: Seasonal Writing

Every week our editors publish somewhere between 10 and 15 blog posts—but it can be hard to keep up amidst the busyness of everyday life. To make sure you never miss another post, we’ve created a new weekly round-up series. Each Saturday, find the previous week’s posts all in one place.  ‘Tis the Season…...

julia-vanishes-book-cover

7 Writing Rules You Can Ignore

When I say you can ignore these rules, I don’t mean that you should. These “truisms” floating around about writing are useful to think about, especially when you’re starting out, and they can point you to weaknesses in your work. In the end, though, you have to trust your own process. Here are seven...

CraftingDynamicDialogue

Using Internal Dialogue to Achieve Multiple Effects

Internal dialogue is the inner voice of character. Which is, frankly, a very metaphysical subject. In most modern cultures—and, consequently, most modern literature—there’s a dichotomy within the self: there’s an I and a Me. I like my eyebrows. I have to be strict with myself when it comes to pecan pie. Internal dialogue is...

Robert Lee Brewer

4 Poetry Chapbook Strategies

Since many poets are getting together their November chapbooks this month, here are some poetry chapbook strategies. These are different than the 5 Tips for Organizing Poetry Chapbook Manuscripts, which is also worth a quick read. Here are four poetry chapbook strategies: Include Only Your Most Vital Poems. Ten pages of great poetry is...

1967

#ThrowbackThursday: Old-School Ads in Writer’s Digest

Writer’s Digest has been around for nearly 97 years—which means that developments in technology and shifts in culture have, in many ways, wildly altered the litterateur landscape. (Some things, though, like pen, paper, and a good ol’ copy of White’s Elements of Style, never go out of fashion.) For this week’s blast from the past, we curated some of...

the-house-between-tides-book-cover

7 Things I’ve Learned So Far, by Sarah Maine

7. Patience. Perhaps the most important thing I have learned so far is patience. Patience with myself when nothing seems to go well, patience waiting for feedback from busy friends or professionals (and patience with their comments when they arrive…), patience as publishers consider their response, and patience until that great day when it...

Holiday Gift Guide 2016

Holiday Gift Guide 2016: What to Get a Writer

Use our 2016 Holiday Gift Guide to pin down a present for the wordsmith in your life. The following is a smattering of our favorite literary miscellanea these days. 1. Literary-Themed Scarves Let words bring you warmth—literally. These infinity scarves from Storiarts wrap you in passages from classics such as Jane Eyre, Les Miserables...

Robert Lee Brewer

Wednesday Poetry Prompts: 374

Wow! After a month of writing a poem each and every day, it felt so weird going a whole week between prompts. For today’s prompt, write a pop poem. This poem could be about popcorn, pop-up books, pop-out decorations, pop quizzes, pop culture, Pop-Tarts, or any number of pop-related topics. Just wait long enough,...

screen-shot-2016-12-01-at-11-26-30-am

Write Your Manifesto

When you are clear about who you are as a writer—meaning you know what you write and for whom—you can create more coherently and productively. The tricky part is that people evolve. Life stages and life events will inevitably shape you. The words you read and write will transform you. And the company you...

Ha Ha Ha Thump, by Amorak Huey

Amorak Huey: Poet Interview

Please join me in welcoming Amorak Huey to the Poetic Asides blog! Amorak Huey, a former newspaper editor and reporter, is author of the poetry collection Ha Ha Ha Thump (Sundress, 2015) and the chapbooks The Insomniac Circus (Hyacinth Girl, 2014) and A Map of the Farm Three Miles from the End of Happy...

poets_market_robert_lee_brewer

WD Poetic Form Challenge: Landay

A new month means a new WD Poetic Form Challenge–this time for the landay! Find the rules for writing landays here. It’s an interesting form that can be as concise as a couplet or expand for several stanzas. So start writing them and sharing here on the blog (this specific post) for a chance...

max agent

New Literary Agent Alert: Maximilian Ximenez of L. Perkins Agency

Maximilian is actively pursuing clients for both fiction and nonfiction works. In fiction, he is acquiring science fiction, fantasy, horror and thrillers, particularly cyberpunk and neo-noir as well as books with a uniquely deconstructive bent. For nonfiction, Maximilian is seeking popular science, true crime and books pertaining to arts and trends in developing fields...

160819-westworld-s1-blast-07-1280

What Is Your Character’s Cornerstone?

If you’re not watching the excellent HBO series Westworld, you should. Not only is the show a study in deft plotting and complex themes, but it’s a delicious, entertaining mystery that continues to surprise me week after week. (The season 1 finale is tonight at 9:00 EST, but it’s worth a binge-fest.) For the unitiated, here’s a...

Weekly Round-up: Author Insights and Challenge Winners

Every week our editors publish somewhere between 10 and 15 blog posts—but it can be hard to keep up amidst the busyness of everyday life. To make sure you never miss another post, we’ve created a new weekly round-up series. Each Saturday, find the previous week’s posts all in one place.  Author Insights Anxiety...

Robert Lee Brewer

WD Poetic Form Challenge: Haiku Sonnet Winner

Here are the results of the Writer’s Digest Poetic Form Challenge for the haiku sonnet. As usual, many poems made the original cut before I was able to get it down to a Top 10 list and eventual winner. Read all the haiku sonnets here. Here is the winner: Waterfall, by William Preston White...

wd0117_500

Answers to Your Novel Writing Questions

I’ve interviewed enough authors over the years to know this: Even the most successful among them can remember with vivid clarity the tentative tingling of first sitting down to write a novel and feeling as if they had no idea what they were doing. In fact, some of them still experience that odd mingling...

Robert Lee Brewer

2016 November PAD Chapbook Challenge: Next Steps

Okay, here are the next steps for this challenge. Before you dive into them, click here to read the original guidelines for the challenge. Step One: Write the Poems We accomplished this step during the month of November. We have 30 prompts to prove it. Step Two: Revise the Poems This step is optional,...

shadow-of-gods-book-coverjpg

7 Things I’ve Learned So Far, by Rachel Dunne

This is a recurring column I’m calling “7 Things I’ve Learned So Far,” where writers (this installment written by Rachel Dunne, author of IN THE SHADOW OF THE GODS) at any stage of their career can talk about writing advice and instruction as well as how they possibly got their book agent—by sharing seven things they’ve learned along their...

Robert Lee Brewer

2016 November PAD Chapbook Challenge: Day 30

Today’s our last chance to poem for November 2016. Tomorrow, I’ll post next steps for this challenge, which involves going through poems written throughout the month. But today… Write a last chance poem. The poem could be about having a final chance at something, whether it’s writing a poem, saying goodbye, or singing a...

emotion, fiction, stakes

How to Create Moral Stakes in Your Fiction

We experience life as feelings. Yet, so much fiction is written to minimize feelings or leave them out altogether. It’s as if emotions are not a fit subject or writing about them is too simplistic. Even fiction that celebrates feelings, romance for instance, can sometimes work with only a limited and familiar emotional palette....

Robert Lee Brewer

2016 November PAD Chapbook Challenge: Day 29

Only 2 days left! So it’s appropriate… For today’s prompt, we’re once again doing two-for-Tuesday prompt. So pick one, combine both prompts into one poem, or write two (or more) different poems. Here are the prompts: Write a love poem. A poem about love, people who are in love, attempting to woo, or some...